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, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
overnight after morsi refused to reverse his decrees. he met with egypt's top judges and told them the powers are meant to be temporary. they had a mass froes but canceled them to avoid any clashes. two men are arrested for their roles in the fast and furious operation. he was sentenced to 3 and a half years behind bars and shawn stewart sentenced to nine years. both men illegally purchased weapons and smuggled them into mexico in order to give to members of drug cartels there. fast and furious was -- two were found at the shooting of border patrol agent brian perry. >>> an ohio mother is under rays after her 3-year-old son's body was found in a treatment plant. his mother called 911 claiming he disappeared from a park. >> i am at a park and my son is missing. i was looking every where. >> police say the story started changing as she failed a polygraph test. one of the other children was pointing to a garbage truck around where he disappeared. they decide to do check the landfill. his body was found in a trash bag. she is being held on murder charges. >>> here's a lesson of what no
of peace looking at the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia and libya. the arab spring are in the state of transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each. this took place earlier this week in washington. it's two hours. >> good morning everyone. i'm steve heydemann for issues of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on the securities sector reform in the arab world and some rsvp to me have been scared by the false rumor that it would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that is not the case. so you do not need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you here with us all this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important but also especially urgent. i do not think that it is an exaggeration to say what happens with the security sectors in the arab world and by security sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus that
article, "new york times," egypt tumult, a rift emerges in morsi's team. morsi, who is part of the muslim brotherhood, they say hey, you know what? we're not going to be involved in the process. we're just going to sit back here. we're going to read our koran. and we're just going to sit back. suddenly they decide we're going to be involved in the process, which is all right. and then we see this weekend, morsi is seizing power that he doesn't have. egypt's about to get really ugly again. >> you know, i think that you see the pushback in the streets. morsi's not going to be able to get away with everything that he wants to get away with. they've turned a corner. >> what's his justification for seizing all of this power illegally? >> hubris. the guy -- he had just helped broker a deal in gaza, and he felt that he had some running room with the americans because he, you know, had essentially done our bidding. >> he's got the president of the united states calling him, the american secretary of state. >> that kind of goes to your head. >> yeah. i'm a big guy. >> you know, you live half your
tension in egypt this morning, among opponents of that country's president, mohamed morsi. things started getting rough on the streets of cairo, with protesters hurling molotov cocktails at police. they are seething about morsi's powers of placing himself beyond judicial review. a massive demonstration by morsi's opponent is planned for today. >>> we wanted you to check this out. from australia, early this morning. look at that. a crane, high above the streets of sydney caught fire. and then, the crane's arm falls on the roof of a nearby building. the rain operator escaped down a loader. no one was injured. the site was closed for a time. two weeks ago, concerns that diesel was leaking from the crane. the crane's owner also owns the crane in new york that collapsed during hurricane sandy. >> interesting there. >>> and speaking of sandy, one month after the month monster s the financial toll keeps growing. andrew cuomo says the repair for the state and new york city will top $32 billion. and the fallout continues at lipa, the long island utility company that's under fire for its slow respo
get nuclear weapons and so will saudi arabia, egypt and turkey. lou: thank you so much, john. i appreciate it. thank you very much. coming up next, the campaign has been one of the dirtiest in history. twitter exploding with death threats aimed at governor romney and a nation bitterly divided. the good doctors join us to psychoanalyze the nation and these candidates. the polls close in virginia at the top of this hour the campaign is done, the voting just about done on the east coast. cheryl casone will have a preview of what is on board. we are talking exit polls next. ally bank. why they're alwaysthere to . i love you, james. don't you love me? i'm a robot. i know. i know you're a robot! but there's more in you than just circuits and wires! uhhh. (cries) a machine can't give you what a person can. that's why ally has knowledgeable people there for you, night and day ally bank. your money needs an ally. lou: fox news conducting exit polls throughout this election day. the polls still open, but we are receiving some early insight into how voters feel about some very important is
, and you could save hundreds. liberty mutual insurance -- responsibility. what's your policy? >>> egypt passes a new draft constitution, but that doesn't mean the country's crisis is over. lisa sylvester's monitor thag and some of the other top stories in "the situation room" right now. lisa, what do you have? >> hi there, joe. hundreds of egyptians gathered for prayer in tahrir square today, protesters vowed to return to the streets. this after an assembly led by muslim brotherhood members passed a new constitution to replace the one scrapped in last year's revolution. it still must be approved by egyptian citizens, many of whom are angry at the government at what they consider to be a power grabby president mohamed morsi. and in new jersey a train car carrying highly toxic chemicals crashed into a creek near the delaware river early this morning. it happened after a bridge collapsed. the area was evacuated. and more than 18 people were treated for respiratory issues and exposure to leaking vinyl chloride. it's a known cancer-causing chemical that can cause headaches and dizziness. >>>
this to bear at the same time, the marines were in yemen. they were dealing with hot spots there. egypt, there are situations in egypt that had to be dealt with. there were situations all over the middle east popping up because of this film. so whether or not the forces that were engaged whether or not they knew this film was coming out and decided let's use this date to get in with the crowd and make this look like an out-of-control protest, but at the same time have something serious going on or not, i don't know whether they thought that or not but it did happen that way, and the real question that has to be answered on the hill today, if this does happen, how well prepared are we to deal with it? >> very interesting. also heating up is israel, the fighting there. we're out of time. what's your headline here? >> schools are closed there, people are being told to stay close to home. when they hear the air raid sirens, to move quickly. this is just continuing to grow. >> jj green, wtop, national security expert. i'm going to say expert. you may say
and sending a message to palestinians. egypt is standing by the people of gaza and their pain, he said. people took vac of the relative lull in violence to stock up on whatever they could. since israel began its attacks getting food has become more difficult this man explained. hamas has not fired into southern israel and israel fired into gaza with the death toll so far is 19, including 5 children. the latest violence exploded with israel assassinated hamas' military chief on wednesday n.gaza, gunfire, anger and defiance and a creaseless barrage of rockets and missiles, the israeli air force carrying out what it called precision strikes, but in crowded gaza it's the civilians who bear the brunt. this child, the son of a local bbc technician, was 11 months old when he was killed by an israeli air strike. savannah, you know, we've been speaking to palestinians here, and the sense they have is fear and anxiety. they are extremely afraid of what could be coming next on the horizon. the focus though is what is it going to take to break this impact now between the palestinian factions and the israe
for the antimuslim film which makes you wonder why egypt is a sinkhole but others say it is wrong to revel in someone else's misery but i am not surprised there is a lot of that going around. president obama opened that door. no one heard of the video until he decided to be the p.r. agent so they could blame someone for the security debacle in benghazi. he would have held a world premiere in times square with susan rise on the red carpet with joan rivers. and u.s.a. today a newspaper published in airports i believe refers to the film as one that sparked waves of protests. with garbage. bungling benghazi, he opened the path for no justice. he wanted to play the global healer and i call this a man made disaster but napolitano coined that phrase already. >> big question: where the heck is the director? you would think that an enterprising journalist, "rolling stone" "mother jones," aclu would try to get ahold of the guy and find out what is going on but he is in a deep are hole that gitmo. >> rebel sean hannity after trayvon martin he got an interview with george zimmerman and the lawyer sat there next
would be between israel and iran. this has people paying attention. >> this is a test from egypt and the change in government and they're saying i think hamas is saying how much support are we going to get from them? this is a test of the new middle east and how much support they get and we'll see. morsi is in a difficult place because the egyptian economy is not doing well. they need tourism, it's fallen completely down. the moderate elements in egypt are saying let's get on the economy here and the radical elements are saying support hamas, and this is going to be a real test of his leadership. >> this is the sort of situation that makes you think twice about your forecast for where the dow heads if something were to expand from this? >> yeah, i mean, well, the only good thing is there's no oil in gaza, egypt or israel really. steve is saying if it's a conflagration in the entire mideast, obviously we're not energy independent yet, trying to get there. i don't think it's going to get that far. i think they're testing the political waters here and seeing how we position ourselve
. >>> the ancient resting place of an egyptian princess has been uncovered in egypt. archaeologists say they have unearthed a cemetery 4,500 years old. it is in an area south of cairo. the tomb indicates she was the daughter of the king. it's surrounded by the burial sites from high officials from the fifth dynasty. the scientists say all of the monuments belong to some very powerful families there. and the scientists say they hope to find more tombs in the area. the discovery comes just weeks after the egyptian government reopened a pyramid and some tombs that had been closed for ten years for restoration there. >> wow. >> amazing. >> that is. >>> that's our broadcast for now. "nightly news" is up next.
: we will leave it there. a couple of stories regarding the situation in egypt. the lead story in "the washington post" -- also regarding the same story in "the financial times" -- back to the phones with our discussion for remedies to speed up the voting process. cathy, you are on "the washington journal." del ahead. caller: we have a vote by mail here. it is wonderful. we do not have problems. i am a little bit surprised a many people in the eastern part of the united states think there is so much fraud. we really do not have that much of a problem here. we always have a paper ballot to recount. host: our next call comes from jane in philadelphia on the line for republicans. caller: the story a minority inspector at the polls. -- i am a minority inspector at the polls. i think the only way to fix the problem is with an id. i had a van pulled up and ask them to see if they were in the book. they were not. they handed me a voter registration card. it looked strange to me. it was stamped from the city of philadelphia. the address said south spruce street. i know it runs east to west. it
the librarian in alex dry ya egypt, for instance, who roughly measured the world with not much more than a calendar and the sun and a big stick in the ground... ... >> on the other hand, the texas state books are of controversy they spend more erred time talking about jefferson davis bid thomas jefferson borough talking about school books specifically they're determined in different states and they have rules what they could and should say. i am not a textbook writer or critic. there is a problem. i grew up with books that did not have the non-white to european model. i was trying to address the under representation. in recent years there is a sense not including the asians and hispanic americans. one of the things when i wrote my book america is a hidden history talking about spanish america talk about columbus but the spanish in the united states of america of this is what i thought was an extraordinary story not told to me. the first pilgrims. there were not englishmen sailing over on the mayflower but they were french. they have a good sense to go to florida in june and sale 50 years
on the ground in places like libya and egypt. you think this will reflect well on the u.s., or look like we are entering conflict for our own and game? guest: i don't think we choose to enter conflicts. we stuck with mubarak for while. we went with the protests as soon as they began on the streets. president obama trying not to become embroiled in to torsions abroad where he does not have to, but when things get too -- in situations abroad where he does not have to, but when things get to bad, he will. host: a comment on twitter. talking about ben ghazi and libya. what do those debts to reveal about president obama's foreign policy leadership? guest: that is a tough situation. i have been more following the campaign than the twists and turns of what happened in libya. it has not gotten a lot of coverage in some of the media. fox news have been pounding on it hard. i think maybe we will get some cooler answers after the election. host: jacksonville, fla., independent caller, patricia. caller: i am so sorry. i have three points i want to make and i were you to be patient with me. the first is
is reelected iran will get nuclear weapons and so will saudi arabia, egypt and turkey. jon: ambassador bolton will be here live with more analysis next. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] help brazil reduce its overall reliance on foreign imports with the launch of the country's largest petrochemical operation. ♪ when emerson takes up the challenge, "it's never been done before" simply bemes consider it solved. emerson. ♪ jon: a fox weather alert for you now. a nor'easter bearing down on the northeast bringing strong winds, snow and rain as areas hard hit by sandy get ready for the impact. janice dean is in the fox weather center and has more for us now. jd. >> reporter: oh, jon it's the worst news. if this was a run ever the mill nor'easter we'd say yeah we can deal with this. but the coastline is vulnerable. trees are vulnerable. homes are vulnerable all along the area that is going to get hit by this nor'easter. already we are getting some snow. snow reports across atlantic city and then up towards jfk airport getting reports of snow. connecticut, much of parts of southern connecticut in towar
the librarian in alexandria, egypt, for instance. i hope i am not mangling his name to badly. roughly measure the world with not much more than, you know, a calendar and the sun and the big stick in the ground. and when you see that extraordinary sense of developing knowledge about the natural world, that comes out of your curiosity, that is what i think i'm talking about when i talk about kids natural curiosity and how we have to keep telling the stories to fire up their imagination and creativity. >> host: zero contrarian tweet sent to you, these days history class is tend to focus almost exclusively on the underrepresented groups mentioned. do we spend -- are we to eurocentric? to spend too much time on the magellan and columbus? >> tina, that's a good question. i think it has been somewhat addressed. some people think that it has swung too far. i know, for instance, there were some concerns a few years ago that there were history standards coming out that did not mention robert e. lee. on the other hand, there are the texas state textbooks which have been the subject -- subject of some co
your mother would be gone for years. she came to the u.s. in egypt even know it. >> guest: she's still like that in a way, you know, where she does things that we don't fit into the equation sometimes. and it's been a struggle to get her to be a little more motherly. i think at this point we've come to expect that's the way she is and we just take her as she is. i think it helps because we're not disappointed. i do hope we could be a better grandmother. i know my great-grandmother, my mother said she wasn't such a great mother. but to ask him if she was the most wonderful grandmother in the world. so i'm hoping that's the way my children feel for her as well. that's all i want for my kids have a good relationship. >> host: reyna grandecan assume other mother to read this book, or does she know within a? >> guest: she hasn't read the book is it's in english and my mother does not speak english. she knows some of us in it because i told her this is the story about my childhood and growing up in the u.s. and i write about you, my dad, but i don't think my mother really understand about ho
people made these very extraordinary discoveries. i talk about the librarian in alexandria, egypt, eratosthenes. of i'm not mangling his name too badly who roughly measured the world without much more than a calendar and the sun and a big stick in the ground. when you see that extraordinary sense of developing knowledge about the national -- natural world that comes out your curiosity that is what i'm talking about what i talk about kids's natural security of a city and how we have to keep telling these stories to fire up their imagination and their creativity. >> guest: history classes focus almost exclusively on the underrepresented groups mentioned. are we too for course been too much, and magellan and columbus and so on? >> that is a good question and it has been somewhat addressed, some people think that it has one too far. for instance there was some concern a few years ago that their history stand is coming that the dimension robert e. lee and on the other hand the texas textbooks have been a subject of controversy because they spend more time talking about jefferson davi
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)